the heart of life: DTES and Gentrification: A Case Study

tenfourth:

My experience walking down Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside (DTES) was reflective and meaningful to say the least. During my trip I felt sadness, then happiness though by the end of my walk I again felt sadness. When the “tour” first started Union Gospel Mission volunteer, Auto, gave me some…

It sounds like you’re already volunteering, so that’s a start.

You can get involved in community meetings and the programs.

And totally check out Pivot Legal Society! They’re heavily involved with the DTES community

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 2 notes.
spunkmate:

littleojibwe:

tanninginparadise:

See this picture? This comes from a town in Canada where a 24 pack of water bottles is 104 dollars and formula milk for a baby is priced at 55 dollars a pack. What’s more, a pack of diapers is 95 dollars and one head of lettuce is 26 dollars. Inuit people are starving in a country known for it’s generosity.
If you don’t believe this is true, you can find more images like this here. This is the only grocery store these people have in their small towns, and many people are going hungry & elderly are dying faster.
You’ll send aid to foreign children that are starving, so why won’t you pay a little extra to feed the people in your own country who work hard & still can’t afford the prices for healthy food for their families?
Please have a heart and reblog this photo to raise awareness that even in our own countries people are starving, join the movement and show the government that we won’t sit by and watch people starve. 
If you think this will make your blog ugly you’re wrong. Children in a first world country are getting sick & starving, and nobody is even aware it’s happening. You can let people know by reblogging and showing you care. People I am close to, my friends and future in-laws are going through this. 

Love how little attention this post gets from my beach blog followers.

This. 

spunkmate:

littleojibwe:

tanninginparadise:

See this picture? This comes from a town in Canada where a 24 pack of water bottles is 104 dollars and formula milk for a baby is priced at 55 dollars a pack. What’s more, a pack of diapers is 95 dollars and one head of lettuce is 26 dollars. Inuit people are starving in a country known for it’s generosity.

If you don’t believe this is true, you can find more images like this here. This is the only grocery store these people have in their small towns, and many people are going hungry & elderly are dying faster.

You’ll send aid to foreign children that are starving, so why won’t you pay a little extra to feed the people in your own country who work hard & still can’t afford the prices for healthy food for their families?

Please have a heart and reblog this photo to raise awareness that even in our own countries people are starving, join the movement and show the government that we won’t sit by and watch people starve. 

If you think this will make your blog ugly you’re wrong. Children in a first world country are getting sick & starving, and nobody is even aware it’s happening. You can let people know by reblogging and showing you care. People I am close to, my friends and future in-laws are going through this. 

Love how little attention this post gets from my beach blog followers.

This. 

(via retrogradewaters)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 113,295 notes.
When someone works for less pay than she can live on - when, for example, she goes hungry so that you can eat more cheaply and conveniently - then she has made a great sacrifice for you, she has made you a gift of some part of her abilities, her health, and her life. The “working poor,” as there are approvingly termed, are in fact the major philanthropists of our society. They neglect their own children so that the children of others will be cared for; they live in substandard housing so that other homes will be shiny and perfect; they endure privation so that inflation will be low and stock prices high. To be a member of the working poor is to be an anonymous donor, a nameless benefactor, to everyone else.

Barbara Ehrenreich, “Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By In America”

I recently read this book, and while several observations and statistics stuck out to me, this quote, on the last page, I believe really sums things up quite well.

(via lostgrrrls)

Forget the billionaire “job creators” — our working poor are really the ones supporting our economy.

(via stfuconservatives)

NO! The working poor do not CHOOSE to go hungry as a selfless act of benevolence. They are not ‘anonymous donors,’ they are TRAPPED. I have been the working poor, the unemployed poor, the ‘how-the-fuck-will-I-survive’ poor. I was NEVER a goddamn martyr for anyone. You are not a philanthropist unless it is by choice. I don’t care if they’re trying to show that the poor should be valued, what it ends up looking like is that there’s some sort of decision being made to suffer for the benefit of others, and that’s bullshit. What it looks like is ‘Oh, you should thank them for their kindness,’ not ‘Let’s change this.’

Maybe I’m missing some tone of sarcasm here? But it doesn’t look like it to me.

(via mamabirdmargaritas)

Yikes. I apologize that the quote I pulled from the book made it perhaps sound like she was saying poverty is a choice, because Ehrenreich makes it VERY clear throughout the rest of her writing that living in poverty is not a choice and is, instead, entrapment. She makes it very clear that the people she’s talking about here aren’t making these sacrifices out of some desire to help the people they’re serving, but rather out of necessity. I read this whole bit not so much as “thank the poor for their philanthropy!” as “Yeah, so this system is totally fucked because, in order for some people to get rich and comfortable, we are exploiting a very large number of people who are barely getting by as it is, and we have them do all the jobs we really don’t want to do, and have them work their fingers to the bone, but we’ll only pay them minimum wage, which isn’t enough to thrive, much less even survive, on.” And that, well, everyone who’s not in that class benefits from it too, and we should be well aware of that so we can work toward change and push harder for living wages.

Basically, I saw this quote as a somewhat more explanatory way to say that oft-spoken idea that it’s really those on the lowest rung of our class system that are supporting our capitalist economy, NOT the huge corporations who think they are.

(via lostgrrrls)

Yeah I was wondering what I was missing. I was like, “This can’t really be a thing, can it?” but so often it is. Thanks for clarifying.

(Source: lostgrrrls, via lostgrrrls)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 1,299 notes.
When someone works for less pay than she can live on - when, for example, she goes hungry so that you can eat more cheaply and conveniently - then she has made a great sacrifice for you, she has made you a gift of some part of her abilities, her health, and her life. The “working poor,” as there are approvingly termed, are in fact the major philanthropists of our society. They neglect their own children so that the children of others will be cared for; they live in substandard housing so that other homes will be shiny and perfect; they endure privation so that inflation will be low and stock prices high. To be a member of the working poor is to be an anonymous donor, a nameless benefactor, to everyone else.

Barbara Ehrenreich, “Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By In America”

I recently read this book, and while several observations and statistics stuck out to me, this quote, on the last page, I believe really sums things up quite well.

(via lostgrrrls)

Forget the billionaire “job creators” — our working poor are really the ones supporting our economy.

(via stfuconservatives)

NO! The working poor do not CHOOSE to go hungry as a selfless act of benevolence. They are not ‘anonymous donors,’ they are TRAPPED. I have been the working poor, the unemployed poor, the ‘how-the-fuck-will-I-survive’ poor. I was NEVER a goddamn martyr for anyone. You are not a philanthropist unless it is by choice. I don’t care if they’re trying to show that the poor should be valued, what it ends up looking like is that there’s some sort of decision being made to suffer for the benefit of others, and that’s bullshit. What it looks like is ‘Oh, you should thank them for their kindness,’ not ‘Let’s change this.’

Maybe I’m missing some tone of sarcasm here? But it doesn’t look like it to me.

(Source: lostgrrrls, via retrogradewaters)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 1,299 notes.
deluxvivens:

stfuconservatives:

maritsa-met:

supersoygrrrl:

nom-chompsky:

But at least one group says the tours “turn poverty into entertainment.”
Stop.

JFC. Wow, I wonder who’re the people making money off this humans on display stroll. I’m totally certain it’s going to help people living in poverty so they can have better lives.

They had bus tours of some of the villas in Buenos Aires when we were there. Rich Americans looking through bus windows at poor people. Ugh.

Fetishizing poor people for fun and profit. Despicable. The whole “voluntourism” thing is problematic, but to say “we turn crippling third-world poverty into FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!” is taking it to a new level of awful.
-Jess

This is pain porn.

Bold/italic at the end from me. Because it’s exactly what made me want to cry. I have been poor enough to not know if I’d have shelter the next week, and to have not eaten for a few days. I cannot IMAGINE what it would be like to live in these places, with these hardships. It doesn’t even compare. If my experience was painful, this must be so much worse.
Paying some asshole to take you on a guided tour of other people’s misery is NOT OKAY.
IT IS NOT OKAY.

deluxvivens:

stfuconservatives:

maritsa-met:

supersoygrrrl:

nom-chompsky:

But at least one group says the tours “turn poverty into entertainment.

Stop.

JFC. Wow, I wonder who’re the people making money off this humans on display stroll. I’m totally certain it’s going to help people living in poverty so they can have better lives.

They had bus tours of some of the villas in Buenos Aires when we were there. Rich Americans looking through bus windows at poor people. Ugh.

Fetishizing poor people for fun and profit. Despicable. The whole “voluntourism” thing is problematic, but to say “we turn crippling third-world poverty into FUN FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY!” is taking it to a new level of awful.

-Jess

This is pain porn.

Bold/italic at the end from me. Because it’s exactly what made me want to cry. I have been poor enough to not know if I’d have shelter the next week, and to have not eaten for a few days. I cannot IMAGINE what it would be like to live in these places, with these hardships. It doesn’t even compare. If my experience was painful, this must be so much worse.

Paying some asshole to take you on a guided tour of other people’s misery is NOT OKAY.

IT IS NOT OKAY.

(via deluxvivens-deactivated20130417)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 349 notes.

I have been

Through enough shit, enough circumstance and abuse to have wanted to kill myself, to have struggled in and with life, in and with myself, in and with the world around me.

And it makes me REALLY, REALLY angry, that so many other people do not have the luck or luxury of getting some of the breaks I’ve gotten, accessing the resources I’ve been able to access, having their struggles eased, even a little bit.

THAT is why I give a fuck about issues that ‘have nothing to do with’ me. Guess what? If someone’s suffering is because of a system that I am a part of - whether intentionally/by choice or not - it is absolutely something I should be involved in finding a solution to.

And you know what - even if I wasn’t a part of that system (impossible!), there is NOTHING wrong with wanting that big, seemingly unattainable fantasy of ‘everyone is happy and healthy’ to someday become a reality.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 7 notes.
Homeless mother who sent six-year-old son to better school in the wrong town jailed for five years.

I am so frustrated. Oh my god. What the HELL?

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 0 notes.